Benson: Britain’s Biggest & Most-Beloved Fish Immortalised in Sculpture

Benson

Some fish are simply more endearing than others.

Known affectionately as “Britain’s biggest and best-loved common carp,” Benson the fish was remarkably hooked by anglers a whopping sixty-three times over thirteen years. In her prime, Benson weighed the same as a large dog – a chunky 64 pounds 2 ounces – and was worth 20,000 GBP.

Benson’s ‘catchability’ (that minx!) made her a loveable oddball amongst amateur anglers, but not so favoured amongst the sport’s elite, who were put off by the hulking carp’s apparent eagerness to remain alive within the  muddied confines of the pond . Despite a booming number of out-of-body-of water-experiences, Benson knew how to play hard-to-get (that tease!). As one fish fancier grumbled, “there was a period when Benson was caught every Monday for six weeks. Then it seemed that she disappeared for the next 12 months.”[1]

Benson was always respectfully thrown back into her life aquatic until sadly she perished in 2009, at the ripe old age of twenty-five. Her death, which caused quite a media splash, was either caused by accidental poison via a noxious bite of bait, or  by internal complications during egg production.

Although 2009 marked the end of Benson’s animate reign, artist Dmitri Galitzine of London decided he would give England’s best-loved fish-friend some proper respect, by whittling a block of Larch  wood into fishy fashion and immortalising her in 2011.

Dmitri Galitzine Benson  2011  Larch  114 x 52 x 35 cm

Dmitri Galitzine
Benson
2011
Larch
114 x 52 x 35 cm

Dmitri Galitzine Benson  2011  Larch  114 x 52 x 35 cm

Dmitri Galitzine
Benson
2011
Larch
114 x 52 x 35 cm

 

 

 

 

[1] Broad, Steve (4 August 2009). “Benson the carp was near the top of angling’s household names”. The Times (London). Retrieved 4 August 2009.

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